Entity Framework: Update-Database Migrates the Wrong DB

Recently I made the switch from using Visual Studio 2015 to using Visual Studio 2017. For the most part the transition was easy. However, I ran into an issue with Entity Framework updating the wrong database. I’m posting the solution here so I don’t forget ūüôā

TL:DR
If you are experiencing issues with Entity Framework then check that your startup project is the correct one.

EF Update-Database Is Not Working

My current setup involves using a local SQL Server Express database. I check the database via SQL Server Management Studio (ManStu) when I run Update-Database to ensure my changes take place. When I run Update-Database from Visual Studio 2015 the changes are reflected in the database. When I run Update-Database from Visual Studio 2017 the changes are not reflected in the database.

Why does Update-Database work correctly in Visual Studio 2015 but not correctly in Visual Studio 2017? Why does Visual Studio 2017 tell me that the changes were applied successfully?

I decided to take a look at the output of Update-Database -Verbose to see if it yielded any helpful information. There I saw:

Target database is: 'MySpecialDB' (DataSource: (localdb)\v11.0, Provider: System.Data.SqlClient, Origin: Convention).

Entity Framework was using (localdb) and not the SQL Server Express database I setup in the app.config. That explains why the changes were applied successfully. However, why was Entity Framework using the wrong database?

The Not So Thrilling Simple Solution

I pursued a number of different routes looking for the solution to this issue. In the end the solution is so simple. The wrong startup project was selected. That’s it. In Visual Studio 2015 I was using a different startup project. In Visual Studio 2017 I never setup a startup project and so one was selected automatically.

As it turns out Entity Framework pulls meaningful information (like database connection information) out of the startup project. The fact that I had the wrong startup project selected in Visual Studio 2017 was the reason why my Entity Framework Update-Database commands were not working the way I expected.

So, lesson learned, if you are experiencing issues with Entity Framework then check your startup project. It could be that you have the wrong startup project selected ūüôā

Fixing UI-SREF-ACTIVE – Specifying a Default Abstract State

I’ve recently begun working with Angular and by extension Angular UI-Router. The fact that you are reading this means that you likely have as well. That said, let’s all pause for a moment and cry together. I know it’s hard. You will get through it. It will be ok. We can do this.

Basic ui-sref-active Usage

One of the things that UI-Router gives you is the ability to add a class to an element if that elements state is currently active. This is done via the ui-sref-active directive.


<ul class="nav navbar-nav" ng-controller="navController">
   
   <li class="nav-node nav" ui-sref-active="active"><a ui-sref="home">Home</a></li>

   <li class="nav-node nav" ui-sref-active="active"><a ui-sref="notHome">Not Home</a></li>

</ul>

So above we have some basic navigation with two states. The home state and the notHome state. The ui-sref-active directive takes care of adding the active class to whichever li contains the state that is currently active.

The Problem with Abstract States

The problem is that the ui-sref-active directive does not work correctly (or as we expect) when the parent state is an abstract state.

Let’s say you want to expand your “home” state a bit. Maybe you want to add a “dashboard” state and from there link to a “messages” state. You might set up your $stateProvider a bit like this.

$stateProvider
	.state("home",
	{
		abstract: true,
		url: "/home"
	})
	.state("home.dashboard", {
		url: "/dashboard",
		views: {
			"content@": {
				templateUrl: "app/home/dashboard.html",
				controller: "DashboardController"
			}
		}
	})
   .state("home.messages", {
		url: "/messages",
		views: {
			"content@": {
				templateUrl: "app/home/messages.html",
				controller: "MessagesController"
			}
		}
	});

You’ll see we’ve setup home as an abstract view. By default we want to land on our home.dashboard state. We also want ui-sref-active¬†to set the active class on our “Home” link regardless of which child state we are on.


<ul class="nav navbar-nav" ng-controller="navController">
   
   <li class="nav-node nav" ui-sref-active="active"><a ui-sref="home.dashboard">Home</a></li>


   <li class="nav-node nav" ui-sref-active="active"><a ui-sref="notHome">Not Home</a></li>

</ul>

You will notice that in the code above we are now using ui-sref¬†to link to ¬†home.dashboard. This is where the problem with ui-sref-active crops up, it will only show the active class if the state is home.dashboard. We want the active class to appear on any child of the “home” state. As it is, the ui-sref-active directive will not detect home.messages¬†as active. So the question becomes, “how can we fix ui-sref-active¬†so that it detects a parent abstract state”?

Fixing ui-sref-active

The answer comes from Tom Grant in the form of a comment on a GitHub issue.

Tom informs us that there is an undocumented built in solution to this ui-sref-active¬†problem. The solution, he says, is to “use an object (like with ng-class) and it will work”.

Code examples that Tom provides:

<!-- This will not work -->
<li ui-sref-active="active">
   <a ui-sref="admin.users">Administration Panel</a>
</li>

<!-- This will work -->
<li ui-sref-active="{ 'active': 'admin' }">
   <a ui-sref="admin.users">Administration Panel</a>
</li>

That’s it. Now we can link to children of abstract ui-router states and ui-sref-active¬†will behave the way we expect it should.

Ubuntu Server not completing upgrade

It’s been about seven months since I setup a Wireless GitLab server. Since then I’ve figured out how to list updatable packages on Ubuntu Server. I’ve also performed several updates using sudo apt-get update && sudo apt-get upgrade.

gzip: stdout: No space left on device

Today I ran into a new problem. Upon trying to perform an update I was presented with a peculiar error. It said gzip: stdout: No space left on device¬†and it told me to run apt-get -f install¬†to fix things up. So… that’s what I tried doing. I tried running the apt-get -f install command but to no avail. The command would not complete successfully.

This is about the time when I start getting really annoyed with Linux and the command line and all the things associated with configuring things manually like do I really need to download the entirety of the Linux MAN files inside my HEAD? DO I NEED TO DO THAT? GAHasldkjsadljfsadfsdsdf!!!!

Calm yourself.

The /boot partition is 100% full

Ok, so it turns out that the apt-get process can fail if the /boot¬†partition becomes 100% full. There were a number of suggestions online that indicated you needed to clean out the /boot partition by removing old linux-images that you don’t need anymore. Many of these suggestions involved using sudo apt-get remove [package-name] or using sudo apt-get autoremove which are both completely valid options… IF APT-GET WERE WORKING. But apt-get is not working, that’s the problem.

So… I Googled a lot and dug through a lot of forums. Finally I stumbled on this uber helpful answer on askUbuntu. I’ll go ahead and paraphrase the answer below so that I can easily find it again. Yes. This is all about me.

Cleaning up the /boot partition

In the case where your /boot partition becomes totally full you can use these steps to clean it up. (From flickerfly on AskUbuntu).

  1. Run the following command to get a list of the linux-image files that you don’t need anymore.
    sudo dpkg --list 'linux-image*'|awk '{ if ($1=="ii") print $2}'|grep -v `uname -r`
    
  2. Create a command to remove the folders you don’t need anymore. You can do that with a command like this (where brace-expansion is used to save keystrokes). Use the output from the command above to build your command.
    EXAMPLE
    sudo rm -rf /boot/*-3.2.0-{23,45,49,51,52,53,54,55}-*
    
  3. Now that apt-get has space to work with you can actually run sudo apt-get -f install to clean things up.
  4. Use Purge to manually resolve issues with “Internal Errors” (if you get any internal errors).
    EXAMPLE
    sudo apt-get purge linux-image-3.2.0-56-generic
    
  5. Run `sudo apt-get autoremove ` to clean up anything orphaned by the manual clean.
  6. Now you can finally proceed with those updates you were wanting to do.
    sudo apt-get update && sudo apt-get upgrade
    

Party?

We can party now I think.

Secrets were required, but not provided

Psst… tl:dr -> rebooting my wireless router fixed the problem.

A few months ago I setup a wireless Gitlab server. This server has been working great. Once in a while I check up on it via SSH and make sure it’s updated. Otherwise, I leave it alone and it’s happy.

That is until today.

Secrets were required, but not provided

Today, for some reason, I could not access my gitlab server via the web interface or push to it via the git cli. In fact, I couldn’t even SSH into it. I had to pull out the ol’ physical monitor and keyboard and MANUALLY connect. Shudder.

First thing I do upon connecting to the server is try to ping google.com of course. It didn’t work. The server could not find the address for Google, and as anyone knows, if you cannot find Google then the internet does not exist. Plain and simple. You might as well be trying to fly a kite in¬†the Marianas trench.

Now, up until this point I’ve had no issues connecting to the internet. The server automatically connects to the WIFI no big deal. However, I thought that¬†maybe the network authorization expired or something? Maybe I can only connect for a few months at a time before re-authenticating. So I tried just that. I whipped out my old friend nmcli¬†and ran:

nmcli device wifi connect MyAccessPoint password 123456789ACB

This is when I see the dreaded¬†Secrets were required, but not provided response. Well – I’m not sure what secrets it wants me to tell it but I mean, the password was right, and I’m certainly not telling it who my favorite little pony is or even if I like little ponies.

I tried several more times, I tried rebooting the server. Nothing worked. It was at that point that I, using another computer, logged into my wireless router and told it to reboot. Several minutes later everything is fine.

Rebooting my router fixed the problem

Why? I don’t know. There has been some talk that some routers will auto select channels that some linux machines do not like.¬†I think that was likely the original issue. Rebooting the router worked because another channel was selected.¬†In any case… long story short. If you are having issues with your wireless server not connecting to your network then try rebooting your router.

Comma delimited list of United States Abbreviations

I’m putting this here because I sometimes need a comma delimited list of the fifty states.

"AL","AK","AZ","AR","CA","CO","CT","DE","FL","GA","HI","ID","IL","IN","IA","KS","KY","LA","ME","MD","MA","MI","MN","MS","MO","MT","NE","NV","NH","NJ","NM","NY","NC","ND","OH","OK","OR","PA","RI","SC","SD","TN","TX","UT","VT","VA","WA","WV","WI","WY"

Hide the Action Center Icon in Windows 10

It’s the little things in life that annoy me. Things like Microsoft’s Edge browser icon re-appearing on my taskbar. Or, when Windows decides to update just before a meeting.¬†I find these kinds of things to be very annoying. That’s why I was a smidgen irked when the Windows 10 Action Center icon popped up on my taskbar and showed no signs of leaving peacefully.

For those of you who do not know what the Action Center Icon in Windows 10 is then allow Leonardo to enlighten you.

Windows 10 Action Center Icon
aRGGG win10 icon, I’ll kill you!

And only now, at the end, do you see your mistake.

Remove the Action Center Icon

Now that we are all aware of the horribleness that is this awful Action Center icon we can set off on our quest to destr… err remove it.

  1. Open the Windows menu
  2. Search for Turn system icons on or off **
  3.  Find the Action Center icon.
    1. If you are not sure where the Action Center icon is, let the WoW splash screen show you.

      Turn system icons on or off list
      DESTROY…
  4. Turn if off
  5. Rejoice in the boundless fruits of your labor.

**Alternatively, if you are old school and hate things like convenience, you can navigate to this setting section via the Control Panel. So hop on in your Conestoga Wagon and navigate to Control Panel > Appearance and Personalization > Taskbar and Navigation > Turn system icons on or off.

Git-SVN, Retrieve your Repo URL

Hi. My name is Jeremy and I use git-svn. You can cry for me if you would like, it’s fine. I’ll give you a moment.

Do you feel better now? Good!

Here is my problem. I often forget where my SVN repo is located. That’s probably because I¬†spend most of my time working in Git and completely oblivious that an SVN repository even exists.

So here goes. You can get your SVN repo url by running the following git-svn command.

git svn info --url

See it’s easy. It’s just not easy to remember. But now it is forever written down for me to find in the future. Hi future Jeremy! I hope life is great!

The Truman Show is about Software Developers

I’m pretty sure that “The Truman Show” is an accurate description of what it’s like to be a software developer. Take the following clip for example starting at 55 seconds in:

“Blocked at every turn!”

I cannot tell you how many times I’ve thought about this line as it relates to the very real *struggle* it is being a software developer.

I mean here is Truman, he knows where he wants to go, Fiji. Getting to Fiji seems like it should be so simple. Really. All you need to do is get down to an Airport, hop on a few planes, maybe take a boat, and you are in Fiji in no time.

It should be so simple.

The reality is that it is not simple. In fact getting to Fiji is quite possibly the most difficult thing he has ever done in his entire life. He runs into issue after issue after issue trying to get to Fiji. He tries to implement solution after solution, and consistently fails. If that doesn’t reflect how I, a software developer, feel *every day* than I don’t know what does.

Here is the thing. Truman is persistent. He keeps going. He get’s creative. And in the end he finally benefits from all his hard work. The problem was *a lot* bigger than he could’ve ever thought. The problem was huge, but Truman solves the problem and he learned a heck of a lot along the way.

So, fellow Software Developers, as you struggle today remember Truman. Remember to be persistent. Remember to be creative. When you run into a blocker, back up, and try a different approach. I believe in you, you can do it.

List Updatable/Upgradable Packages in Ubuntu Server

A little while ago I setup a GitLab box using Ubuntu Server. When I log in to the server it shows me a short message about available updates. The message looks something like this:

Welcome to Ubuntu 16.04 LTS (GNU/Linux 4.4.0-24-generic x86_64)

 * Documentation:  https://help.ubuntu.com/

7 packages can be updated.
0 updates are security updates.

I know that I can update these packages by running `sudo apt-get update && sudo apt-get upgrade` however, I’d like to know what I’m updating before I do it. In the past you could accomplish this by performing a “dry-run” of the command. This essentially showed you the output of the command without actually performing any updates. That worked alright – but honestly, I just want a list of the packages – not the entire output of the command.

Listing the Upgradable Packages

I stumbled upon this answer (made just a few days ago) by AskUbuntu user “doru“. Turns out that getting a list of updatable/upgradable packages is pretty easy. You just run this:

sudo apt list --upgradable

The list --upgradable command¬†will list out all the packages that you can update, what their current versions are, and what the new version is. Boom! That’s exactly what I wanted.

Tell Git to ignore changes to a versioned file

There are times when you do not want git to track changes to a versioned file. In these cases you can update the git index so that it assumes the file is unchanged. This will only affect your local repo and it will take affect until you tell git otherwise.

Tell Git to Not Track Changes

You can tell git to not track changes by using

git update-index --assume-unchanged <file>

Tell Git to Track Changes (Again)

And when you want git to track changes again you can use

git update-index --no-assume-unchanged <file>